how to have the lowest cost lawyer manage your file

When a personal injury claim can garner a fee of over $150,000, it's understandable that lawyer's fees can be seen as exorbitant. 

But, for the most part, the exorbitant costs are just a misunderstanding of why’. In our previous article, “Why Are Lawyer’s So Expensive?” we delved into the costing explanation step-by-step, and breakdown the ‘why’ in the expenses conversation.

But, sometimes, the exorbitant costs are a result of lawyer’s abusing their power in order to charge the maximum price for the least amount of work. 

What do we mean by that?

In our last article, we outlined the costs of the different ranks of lawyers like this:

FIGURE 1: THE PYRAMID OF LEGAL FEES

It doesn’t take reading our last article to see that the cost of a principal is much, much higher than that of a paralegal.

To most, this gap represents a difference in knowledge, responsibility, and output. But, to some, the gap represents an opportunity to overcharge, delude, and con clients.

After all, how is a lay person to know what level of lawyer should be working on their case?

Some lawyers take advantage of this naivety and see it as a chance to use higher level workers on simple admin tasks to ensure maximum return for minimum time.

But lawyer’s, by way of being admitted to uphold the standards of the Surpreme Court of Queensland, owe a fiduciary duty to their clients.

What does that mean?

Definition: Fiduciary Duty

Fiduciary duty is a legal obligation to put another party’s interests before their own.

In relation to personal injury matters, that means lawyers have a legal obligation to put their client’s interests (greater compensation) before their own (financial gain).

Despite this, the system often gets taken advantage of by the guise of ‘work-in-progress’ (WIP).

‘Work-in-progress’ refers to billable time and expenses that have not yet been billed to a client.

In personal injury matters, that’s nearly the entire matter. That’s because a personal injury client is billed at the end of their matter, not throughout like many other areas of law.

This means by the time a client has fought their claim for 18+ months and finally received a payout offer, it can often be too much of a hassle to refute the costs. 

Inside this guide:

  • How a lawyer's hourly rates can be controlled;
  • How to make sure expensive lawyers aren't doing easy admin tasks;
  • How to maximise item-based charges and stop leaving money on the table;
  • How to understand a lawyer's cost agreement and schedule;
  • And more!

Get your free copy of our guide to controlling legal fees in a personal injury matter.

Some of those who have refuted their bill, however, have managed to help uncover the legal fraternity’s best kept secret...

Overcharging through the use of overqualified lawyer’s, erroneous ‘work-in-progress’ hours, and extraneous tasks.

Take the case of Charmaine Hall who refuted her $283,489 bill for the excessive WIP it included. The itemised bill included things like:

  • $4000 for drafting two letters to doctors,
  • $500 for a paralegal to write one letter,
  • And 2-3 hours per medical report, that Ms Hall said she read in 35 minutes.

Or take the case of Pamela Kilah, who was charged $3000 to read one 30 minute document, and an estimated $20,000 to produce another document. She also had ‘grossly excessive’ charges on preparation of documents due to the ‘collaborative model’ the firm had adopted.

This 'collaborative model' meant multiple lawyers of multiple levels of expertise and charge-out rates were working all at once on the one case. The firm claimed this was to get the best result, however it merely resulted in Ms Kilah paying for the time of multiple people at once.

We can also turn to the case of Chris McGrath, who was charged $48 for a welcome letter - part of his gross overcharging of $50,000 from his firm, who, upon request for a review, admitted they had accidentally overcharged him that $50,000. Just a bit of an ‘oversight’.

All of these cases highlight the rollercoaster ride that clients are taken on.

And it doesn’t end there. In fact, it doesn’t take long on Google or sites like LawyersWeekly to find a long string of similar cases.

The most shocking part? You wouldn’t believe the big firm names that continually pop up…

FIGURE 2: YOU'D BE SHOCKED AT THE BIG FIRMS THAT CONSTANTLY APPEAR...

The list of ways lawyers can exploit the system is endless.

As a lay person, it’s important to know what to look out for. Crucial. Vital.

And, as a lay person, you have the responsibility to be knowledgeable and informed. You have the responsibility to control your lawyer’s fees. You have the responsibility to look out for their most common exploitation tactics:

  • Item-based versus time-based discrepancies,
  • Misguiding cost agreements and cost schedules,
  • Misleading no-win no-fee promises,
  • The veil of ‘work in progress’ and how it can be used to cover up high costs and multiple staff.

This article will explore the last point.


So, how do you (as a lay person) know how to control exactly who should be working on your file, and who actually is?

To keep things easy-to-understand and simple-to-follow, we’ll use a hypothetical story about a claimant named Kelly.

We mentioned Kelly in our previous article, and it’s here we’ll continue part of her story.

Kelly and Matthew were driving along a quiet street in the suburb of Woolloongabba before the AFL match of the season – Brisbane Lions v GWS Giants.

Two people getting groceries from their car were narrowly missed as Kelly and Matt’s mini-SUV went hurtling towards them.


They were running a touch late since the babysitter had been stuck in traffic. Because of this, Kelly admitted she was driving a "little faster than usual", not wanting to miss the kick-off.

Being the backstreets of an inner-city suburb, there were a lot of hills, a lot of parked cars, and a lot of crossroads.

It was at one of these crossroads that the unthinkable happened.

After pausing for a mere second, Kelly hit the accelerator to take off.

And in a mere second, her car was abruptly side swiped.

What was meant to be the quarter-time siren was instead the whaling siren of an ambulance.

Both Kelly and Matt were swept up and taken to hospital.

Concussed. In shock. Broken.

It was instantly apparent that Matt would have a long road to recovery, having been on the side of impact.

Luckily, Kelly would be able to return to work within 2 months.

They couldn’t afford to be off-the-tools for any longer than that because they ran their own business, and it heavily depended on their ability to run it.

Kelly and Matt ran a local bookkeeping firm and had a healthy, steady income from it. Not only that, but Kelly, head bookkeeper, had the biggest client base, and there was no way their employees had the capacity to take on extra work.

They would have to hire someone new.

As fate would have it, Kelly’s 2 months quickly became 3. And then 4.

They did have to hire someone new. In fact, they had to hire more than just one.

With the bills adding up, salaries surging, productivity weaning, and profit declining, they decided to engage a law firm to run person injury matters for them.

With experience in bookkeeping, they knew the ride some clients get taken on, and knew better than to accept everything they were told.

They carefully selected a lawyer before asking what some of the things were they could do to keep costs down. The lawyer explained a few simple things:
  • Do some of the heavy lifting themselves by helping gather evidence,
  • Pay for their legal fees upfront (not feasible for many), and,
  • Use the most junior lawyer possible.

They asked him to take them through the last one – how did they know they weren’t going to sacrifice a good outcome at the hands of a cheap paralegal?

That’s where their lawyer, Craig, started explaining the step-by-step process he used with all clients.

 The first part of it? Understanding their liability and quantum scores.

Step 1: Familiarise yourself with the two complexity variables - liability and quantum.

It’s clearly in everyone’s best interest to have the cheapest person do the job.

Inside this guide:

  • How a lawyer's hourly rates can be controlled;
  • How to make sure expensive lawyers aren't doing easy admin tasks;
  • How to maximise item-based charges and stop leaving money on the table;
  • How to understand a lawyer's cost agreement and schedule;
  • And more!

Get your free copy of our guide to controlling legal fees in a personal injury matter.

Clients receive the lowest bill possible, and partners get the opportunity to dedicate their time to greater value-add tasks.

Partners need to dedicate their time to the greater value-add tasks, because these tasks generally have to do with bigger problems.

And with bigger problems comes the need for smarter lawyers.

The two big ‘problems’ that need solving in a personal injury file are:

  • How hard it is to prove liability (who was to blame, or partly to blame, for the accident), and
  • How much compensation will be involved (what is the likely financial loss for the person who was injured. We call this ‘quantum’)

In Kelly and Matt’s case, it sounded pretty cut-and-dry that the other driver was driving recklessly and carelessly and had, for the most part, caused the accident.

Craig also said their quantum sounded pretty good, but to be certain, he was going to have to run them through a simple 11-stage questionnaire.


Step 2: Work out what your quantum and liability with the 11-stage questionnaire.

Any good lawyer will cover the 11 questions in this document a preliminary meeting with a client.

And, any good lawyer can use the answers from the questionnaire to quickly identify the complexity of a case.

And now you can too.

The questionnaire is divided into two sections: ‘liability’ and ‘quantum,’ and will give you two separate scores – one from 1-8 and one from A-H.

Craig went through the questionnaire with Kelly and Matt and concluded their results:

liability questionnaire
liability questionnaire
liability questionnaire

FIGURE 3: KELLY AND MATT'S LAWYER MADE THE PROCESS SIMPLE AND STRAIGHTFORWARD

Kelly, who he used for the example, had a liability score of ‘2’ and a quantum score of ‘2’ – which translated to a ‘B’.

These are the measures of case complexity Craig needed to move onto Step 3.


Step 3: Translate the complexity scores into the legal efficiency matrix.

To translate these scores into something that answers ‘who’ will work on the case, we need to look at something called the ‘legal efficiency matrix’ (LEM).

The LEM visually ‘maps’ out the ‘most junior person’ to the file. It visually represents the legal expertise required in a matter to remain ‘efficient’.

And, as easily as it does that, it is equally as easily misconstrued as ‘confusing’

But it’s okay, don’t be intimidated.

We will walk you through step-by-step exactly what each section means and how it effects your claim.

And by the end of it, you’ll have a certain answer as to who should be managing the majority of your file, and how you can put an end to the overcharging.

Inside this guide:

  • How a lawyer's hourly rates can be controlled;
  • How to make sure expensive lawyers aren't doing easy admin tasks;
  • How to maximise item-based charges and stop leaving money on the table;
  • How to understand a lawyer's cost agreement and schedule;
  • And more!

Get your free copy of our guide to controlling legal fees in a personal injury matter.

How The LEM Works:

The LEM is made up of two axis’ that represent the two complexity variables (liability and quantum $) that you would’ve worked out in Step 2.

  1. 1
    The horizontal line, or ‘x-axis’ represents the liability: how hard is it to prove who was at-fault, from ‘very easy’ to ‘very hard’.
  2. 2
    The vertical line, or ‘y-axis’ represents the quantum: what is the expected worth of the claim from zero to hundreds of thousands of dollars.
legal efficiency matrix

FIGURE 1: LOREM IPSUM

The LEM then has an overlay of 8 different sections as shown below.

legal efficiency matrix

FIGURE 4: THE LEGAL EFFICIENCY MATRIX PAINTS A PICTURE OF THE LOWEST PRICE LAWYER TO MANAGE A FILE AND REMAIN EFFICIENT

As you can see, each zone on the matrix represents the most junior level of lawyer who should be handling that case.

Using your complexity scores on the LEM:

By using your answers from the questionnaire, you can line-up where you fall on both axis’ to find the answer to the million dollar question – who is the lowest price lawyer that should be managing my file?

After Craig drew on Kelly’s complexity results, hers looked a little like this:

legal efficiency matrix

FIGURE 5: KELLY FOUND HER LIABILITY AND QUANTUM SCORES LANDED HER IN THE PINK ZONE

He showed them that the square was completely pink, meaning for the most part it would be a trainee solicitor managing her matter.

He said for the ‘most part’ because things can change.

When asked ‘how so?’, he began to explain.

Occasionally circumstances of a matter might change, and things that once seemed straightforward might now be more complex.

Inside this guide:

  • How a lawyer's hourly rates can be controlled;
  • How to make sure expensive lawyers aren't doing easy admin tasks;
  • How to maximise item-based charges and stop leaving money on the table;
  • How to understand a lawyer's cost agreement and schedule;
  • And more!

Get your free copy of our guide to controlling legal fees in a personal injury matter.

For example, the CCTV footage that they were reliant on might’ve been written over by the business owners already. The witnesses they were trying to follow up have been unreachable. Perhaps the client’s story has changed with the time passing and now their credibility is in question.

These are all factors that could change a lawyer’s ability to prove liability.

As for quantum, perhaps their client is making a speedier recovery and projected medical costs are now lower. Or the client didn’t complete tax statements correctly in the past and now their actual income is in question.

These are some of the factors that could change a lawyer’s ability to prove quantum.

Craig gave an example of if this happened to them -

legal efficiency matrix

FIGURE 6: CRAIG DEMONSTRATED WHAT HAPPENS IF LIABILITY OR QUANTUM SHIFT

Their quantum and liability would both be lowered, meaning they would be shifted into a square that is now partially blue.

This doesn’t mean both a trainee solicitor and solictor will be equally managing the file at the same time.

It means a solicitor, the blue, will need to do about 15% of the work and a trainee solicitor will still handle the remaining ~85%.

These percentages are reflective of how much of the square is covered by their respective colours.

Kelly and Matt were understanding, and content with the explanation they had received.

Craig further assured them that it was rare that circumstances would change so significantly that they needed to upgrade who was working on their file, and, in any situation, they would be made aware of the change.

legal efficiency matrix square example

FIGURE 7: A COMBINATION OF COLOURS REPRESENTS THE PERCENTAGE OF YOUR MATTER BEING WORKED ON BY WHOM.


So where do you fall on the matrix and what does it mean for you?

Below we go through each quadrant and each area step-by-step to help you wholly understand who will be acting on your matter, and why.

The ‘No-Claim’ Zone

The first zone we can look at is the red ‘no claim’ area.

This falls in the lower right-hand quadrant, and essentially represents the type of claim that most lawyer’s won’t take on.

no claim zone

FIGURE 8: THE NO CLAIM ZONE REPRESENTS HARD TO PROVE, LOW QUALITY CLAIMS

This is because the claim has nearly no quantum, or liability is nearly impossible to prove.

It is essentially the area where the amount (and cost) of legal work required well outweighs the outcome.

For example, if we change Kelly and Matt’s story and suggest that they crashed 10 minutes from an AFL game being held in a country town;

  • with no witnesses,
  • with no potential for CCTV,
  • with no traffic lights,
  • with no details of the other driver (hit-and-run),
  • with an admission to speeding, and
  • with a claim that they couldn’t remember if they hit a car or a kangaroo,

liability would be pretty tough.

Inside this guide:

  • How a lawyer's hourly rates can be controlled;
  • How to make sure expensive lawyers aren't doing easy admin tasks;
  • How to maximise item-based charges and stop leaving money on the table;
  • How to understand a lawyer's cost agreement and schedule;
  • And more!

Get your free copy of our guide to controlling legal fees in a personal injury matter.

In fact, using the questionnaire, it would be somewhere around the 8 - if not off the chart.

no claim example

FIGURE 9: KELLY WOULD FALL INTO COLUMN 8 IF SHE HARD A HARD TO PROVE CLAIM

Let’s move onto their quantum.

Let’s suggest that Kelly and Matthew ran a small online store of home-crafts from their garage. Matt sometimes picked up some shifts at the local pub as a bar-tender, but they really just worked to make ends meet and enjoyed relaxing outside of that.

The accident might’ve been serious, but let’s say they both recovered from it fairly quickly – within just two weeks.

Their low income and low loss of income would suggest a pretty questionable quantum as well – somewhere around the ‘G’.

no claim example

FIGURE 10: KELLY WOULD FALL INTO ROW G IF SHE HAD A LOW LEVEL OF QUANTUM

You can see that they’ve fallen into the ‘no claim’ area of the matrix.

But this isn’t to say there isn’t a claim to be made - claims in this area can sometimes be best run by the person themselves.

Claims in this area are also sometimes best to go through other insurance schemes such as TPD or WorkCover.

The ‘Some Lawyers’ Zone

The ‘Some Lawyers’ zone falls just above the no claim area, and is exactly as its name suggests.

It’s the area where quantum is a little higher and liability is a little less hard, that some lawyers might take it on.

some lawyers zone

FIGURE 11: THE SOME LAWYERS ZONE REPRESENTS THOSE CLAIMS THAT COULD BE TAKEN ON BY A SELECT FEW LAWYERS, BUT ARE STILL CONTENTIOUS 

These lawyers can be few and far between, but more than that, these lawyers will generally require the client to forfeit the ‘no-win no-fee’ agreement, and pay them up-front and at the base-rate to mitigate the risk.

For most claimants this isn’t an option so, instead, they run the claim themselves.

For the claimant who does find themselves in this zone and with a lawyer who’s willing to act ‘no-win no-fee’, they should consider themselves very lucky.

It’s rare for a lawyer to do this because a client is protected by the 50/50 rule under law, meaning the lawyer (or likely partner given the liability concerns) could lose out on money, investing more time into it than they’ll receive back in money.

The Paralegal Zone

The next zone we can look at covers the low value, easy claims.

The claims in this zone can be run by paralegals – and should be.

paralegal zone

FIGURE 12: THE PARALEGAL ZONE REPRESENTS EASY-TO-PROVE CLAIMS

Paralegals are generally studying law but are not yet qualified to be solicitors. They are assigned these subsidiary matters to save the client money, and to save the higher level staff for greater value-add matters.

Kelly and Matt would likely fall into this range if their situation were slightly different.

Let’s say that they were driving in the built-up South bank when they were side-swiped. Being a Saturday night, there were tens of witnesses out for dinners and events, walking the streets. The accident happened at a well-lit intersection with traffic lights, with plenty of onlooking CCTV cameras.

These witnesses, CCTV recordings, and Kelly and Matt themselves all painted the same picture – a driver who came flying through an intersection 3 seconds after his light had turned red.

The liability on this would be considered quite straight-forward and achievable for a paralegal to prove.

Inside this guide:

  • How a lawyer's hourly rates can be controlled;
  • How to make sure expensive lawyers aren't doing easy admin tasks;
  • How to maximise item-based charges and stop leaving money on the table;
  • How to understand a lawyer's cost agreement and schedule;
  • And more!

Get your free copy of our guide to controlling legal fees in a personal injury matter.

That’s because the insurer would have a hard time denying the facts that are so readily available from so many sources.

This makes it the perfect case for a paralegal to take on.

The Trainee Solicitor Zone

The next claim zone we’re going to look at is the second easiest and, as such, can be handled by the next level of staff – trainee solicitors. These are also referred to as ‘law graduates’ and ‘law clerks’.

They can handle the lower-value files that are of low-medium difficulty in regard to liability.

trainee solicitor zone

FIGURE 13: THE TRAINEE SOLICITOR ZONE REPRESENTS THE AREA OF SLIGHT DIFFICULTY TO PROVE

Kelly and Matt might fall into this area if the other driver (and his insurer) denied being at-fault in the accident. On top of that, there might be discrepancies in witness statements and some ‘um’ing and ‘ah’ing from Kelly and Matt.

It would mean liability is slightly in question, but because of the CCTV footage and a fair consistency in other witness statements, liability isn’t a massive issue.

This means the case can (for the most part) be run by a trainee solicitor.

The Solicitor Zone

The next zone we move into is the blue zone. This zone indicates low-medium value claims with levels of medium difficulty in proving liability.

solicitor zone

FIGURE 14: THE SOLICITOR ZONE REPRESENTS CLAIMS THAT REQUIRE EVEN MORE WORK ON LIABILITY

Let’s take our example one step further and suggest that Kelly and Matt were side-swiped a little closer to the AFL match than the built-up South Bank.

Let’s suggest it was a suburban backstreet in Woolloongabba instead, where there were no CCTV cameras, and considerably fewer witnesses.

In fact, the only witnesses were two pedestrians nearby and an older couple who were watching TV in their front-room.

The marks on the road and the injuries incurred still thoroughly suggest Kelly and Matt weren’t at-fault, but they’ve lost the direct evidence – the CCTV footage and the admission of fault.

This makes the proof of liability that bit harder, and more suitable for a solicitor.


The Partner Zone

Now that we’ve covered the lower-left quadrant, let’s move to the opposite side - to the top-right.

You might’ve noticed that we haven’t spoken about the quantum much yet.

That’s because, regardless of the quantum, if a claim is worth some money (even if small) and liability is easy to prove, there will be a lawyer out there who will generally take on the matter.

After all, it’s quick, easy  money to them.

Where quantum really comes into play, is in hard-to-prove cases.

That’s because there needs to be something that mitigates the risk when liability starts getting hard to prove.

In some instances that something’ could be publicity or to further a partnership. But in the majority of instances, that something’ is money.

And to ensure they win that money, they need the best-of-the-best on the case.

The partners.

It’s in the top right-hand side of the matrix that we’ll find these lawyers residing.
partner zone

FIGURE 15: THE PARTNER ZONE REPRESENTS THE HARDEST TO PROVE, HIGH QUALITY CLAIMS

This area is a partner’s specialty and, as such, will generally cost the most.

Not only that, but the question of liability means a lot of hard goes into the file, and that hard work can take a lot of time.

Further to that, negotiations can often be lengthy as well because the insurer ultimately wants to settle for the least amount. After all, they are a business aiming to make a profit too.

This essentially means that matters in this area are worth a great deal, but can be long and strenuous, and require a lot of hard work from the best lawyers at the firm.


Given the massive (and ongoing) monetary losses experienced by the pair, any good lawyer (or partner) would be willing to take this challenging case on, knowing the payoff could be massive – despite the risk.

Inside this guide:

  • How a lawyer's hourly rates can be controlled;
  • How to make sure expensive lawyers aren't doing easy admin tasks;
  • How to maximise item-based charges and stop leaving money on the table;
  • How to understand a lawyer's cost agreement and schedule;
  • And more!

Get your free copy of our guide to controlling legal fees in a personal injury matter.

To see how this would look in the real world, let’s go back to Kelly and Matt when they fell into the ‘no claim’ area.


They were hypothetically driving in a country town with little-to-no proof that they weren’t at fault, other than their word.

Let’s suppose, however, that their ‘garage home-goods shop’ was in fact a medium-sized business that they owned together, designing urban playgrounds and structures for towns around Queensland. They had 8 full-time employees and about 35 contractors at any given time.

The accident they had caused Kelly to be off-work for two months, and Matt, a whopping 8.

This meant the business took a massive hit in profits, having to urgently hire three un-trained professionals to somewhat take over their roles temporarily.

Business plummeted, wages sky-rocketed, and Kelly and Matt were helpless.

The Senior Associate Zone

The senior associate zone represents those matters that aren’t at the most extreme end of the difficulty scale, but still have high value.

senior associate zone

FIGURE 16: THE SENIOR ASSOCIATE ZONE REPRESENTS HIGH QUALITY, HARDER TO PROVE CLAIMS

Kelly and Matt might find themselves using a Senior Associate if their accident was in a slightly more public place, but perhaps their accident happened a couple of years ago.

Accidents that happened a couple of years ago, even if in a public place, can still be difficult to prove as witnesses can be hard to gather and CCTV footage might’ve been overwritten.

Regardless, the case is still worth a lot of money and would be valuable for a senior associate to take on board.

The Associate Zone

The associate zone represents claims that are of moderate difficulty but high value.

associate zone

FIGURE 17: THE ASSOCIATE ZONE REPRESENTS HIGH QUALITY, SOMEWHAT HARD TO PROVE CLAIMS

This would be a situation where, say, Kelly and Matt were sideswiped in a suburban street of Woolloongabba (like we described in the solicitor zone), but instead of witnesses being present, there were none.

Proving liability was heavily reliant upon physical evidence collected at the scene, as well as the viability of each party’s word – why should Kelly and Matt be more believable than the other driver? For example.

This type of liability would be difficult to prove for a solicitor, but can be taken in the stride of an associate.

The Upper-Left Quadrant

The last quadrant to explore is the upper left.

Here we continue to drop the ranks of those working on the file.

legal efficiency matrix

FIGURE 18: THE UPPER-LEFT QUADRANT IS MERELY A REFLECTION OF THE LOWER-LEFT

In fact, the upper-left quadrant is merely a reflection of the lower-left.

This is because the claim is easy to run (easy liability), so it isn’t so heavily dependent on the quantum to make it worthwhile like it is in the upper-right quadrant. 

It’s the sweet spot for all lawyers.

it can be like being handed a million dollars on a silver platter.

Inside this guide:

  • How a lawyer's hourly rates can be controlled;
  • How to make sure expensive lawyers aren't doing easy admin tasks;
  • How to maximise item-based charges and stop leaving money on the table;
  • How to understand a lawyer's cost agreement and schedule;
  • And more!

Get your free copy of our guide to controlling legal fees in a personal injury matter.

When a claimant presents with a high quantum and easy liability,


But what is the dream for lawyers, isn’t always for clients.

At least not those clients who have hired a dodgy lawyer.

This zone should incur low costs as the work should be done by no-one higher than a solicitor.

However, dodgy lawyers see this area in particular as one for overcharging.

It’s called the danger zone’.  

overcharging danger zone

FIGURE 19: THE DANGER ZONE IS THE DREAM CLAIM FOR A LAWYER, BUT THE RISKIEST AREA FOR OVERCHARGING

When a claim has a high value and is easy to prove liability, it’s equally as easy to overcharge.

That’s because instead of the lower cost paralegals and trainee solicitors, they can have partners doing the work – charging a high hourly price for something that could’ve been done for half of it.

It’s matters like this where it pays (quite literally) to go with a bigger firm, with a team of juniors, to reduce costs on your matter.

It’s matters like this where it pays to be a smart claimant, informed of who should be managing your matter and who actually is.


So once you know who is managing your matter, what happens next?

The next thing you need to consider is how the tasks will be delegated and to whom they'll be delegated to. 

See, the LEM generally covers the process parts of a claim – the evidence gathering – proving that their client wasn’t at fault, and proving the claim is worth what they say it is.

The fact of the matter is, there’s more to a claim then evidence gathering. Or making that call. Or chasing that police report.

There are some crucial parts of a claim where responsibility is passed to those higher up the pecking order, no matter what the liability or quantum is.

To find out who will be handling your matter tasks and how they are delegated, you can read our next article (coming soon). 

Inside this guide:

  • How a lawyer's hourly rates can be controlled;
  • How to make sure expensive lawyers aren't doing easy admin tasks;
  • How to maximise item-based charges and stop leaving money on the table;
  • How to understand a lawyer's cost agreement and schedule;
  • And more!

Get your free copy of our guide to controlling legal fees in a personal injury matter.


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